Property Fund Pricing Basis

1 min read 2 Aug 17

The pricing of the M&G Property Portfolio and M&G Feeder of Property Portfolio changed from an offer basis to a bid basis on Tuesday 7 June 2016.

M&G Property Portfolio

Each day we value the assets of the M&G Property Portfolio on both an ‘offer’ basis (how much they would cost to buy) and a ‘bid’ basis (how much the fund would receive if they were sold). The difference between the two prices reflects the costs of buying and selling properties, in particular Stamp Duty Land Tax paid on purchases which can account for up to 5% of the property value. The published dealing prices are on either the offer basis or bid basis, depending on whether people are generally buying fund shares (the fund is in ‘net inflow’) or selling shares (the fund is in ‘net outflow’).

The difference between the two prices is significant and can be in excess of 6%. Therefore a change in the pricing basis from bid to offer, or vice versa, will lead to a significant decrease or increase in what investors will receive or pay when they sell or buy shares.

For large deals (regarded as deals in excess of £50,000) the dealing price you receive may be different from the published price. If you are buying shares, you may receive a price that is higher than the quoted offer price. If you are selling shares, you may receive a price that is lower than the quoted bid price. 

M&G Feeder of Property Portfolio

The price of the shares in the M&G Feeder of Property Portfolio is largely based on the price of shares in the Property Portfolio. A change in the pricing basis of the M&G Property Portfolio will therefore result in a similar change in the price of the units of M&G Feeder of Property Portfolio. 

The difference between the two prices is significant and can be in excess of 6%. Therefore a change in the pricing basis from bid to offer, or vice versa, will lead to a significant decrease or increase in what investors will receive or pay when they sell or buy shares.

The value of a fund's assets will go down as well as up. This will cause the value of your investment to fall as well as rise and you may get back less than you originally invested. Past performance is not a guide to future performance.